Aerial Ladder Consideration

In major cities, this problem is less prevalent then in small departments that might have minimal manpower and less fire duty and don’t use their aerial as much as others.

This is not an aerial ladder program by any means but just some random thoughts for a small training on aerial use.

Make sure all drivers and operators are specially trained and re-trained as necessary on a regular basis.

Do not overload or use beyond design strength or performance ratings.

Inspect after each use completely and document and report deficiencies.

Make sure that ladder and all ground ladders are tested annually.

Use extreme caution on any uneven surfaces and steep hills.

Ladder will have less load carrying at lower angles.

Ladder will have less load carrying at greater extension.

Use caution with loose gear around the turntable area.

Operators should be attentive to inclinometer during use.

Always be aware of overhead obstructions, wires, overhangs, etc.

Keep the tip visible and lit well during night operations.

Maintain hydraulic system constantly. Take precautions in extreme cold weather.

Operate within the manufacturer’s instructions and or specifications.

In general get the rig out and have operators perform certain designated tasks, such as placement drills, speed of set up (safely!), and smoothness in operation of controls.

Do not trust that an operator with only limited operating experience will be able to use this vital piece of equipment when needed.

Train with nightime operations as well!

Pete Lamb
Copyright 2013

Personnel Accountability

Just a small reminder that the rules of accountability state that you should be within VOICE, VISUAL, or TOUCH with your partner and crew.

The next time you have an incident or a drill, try and do that and see how
really difficult it is. Practice this when you are on the simple “smells and bells” calls.

At your next call or training drill have someone see how many times this rules gets violated

This is a real chore and can be a pain in the neck.

As conditions change and the area becomes filled with smoke, the visual goes away.
Move closer!

The voice becomes muffled by a mask and you now have to be much closer than you were.
Move closer!

Smoke banked to the floor and high heat….you must be in touch contact in case something goes wrong, you can assist your crew members.

At your next five incidents try to maintain this level of accountability.

E-Mail back and tell us how difficult that really is.

It’s hard work to stay safe….but really give it a shot, you and your family are worth it!

Pete Lamb
Copyright 2013

Tactical Fire Problem – Furniture Store

This week the tactical problem involves an extremely significant fire problem. This is an older building, taxpayer style, with a furniture store on floor 1. Lets take a look.

1.) It is always a great size up feature when the age of the building is right on the front! Lets look at the height of the building above the second story window tops. What does that indicate?

2.) What types of problems do the two vehicles create for the stretch? What is your pre-connect length and how will that be affected by pulling up “on the curb”?

3.) Fire showing floor 1 on the A/B corner and the storefront window has blown. Based upon previous fire history and study, with a load of modern furnishings and this increase in air at a low level, how much time do you have to make a stretch with a big line?

4.) Conditions on floor 2 are relatively clear but it looks like the cockloft is roaring. How big is your crew, how much help do you have, and get you react and operate on the floor above, with a significant void space fire?

5.) Preplan any of these buildings that you might have in your area. Also this might be the time to remember the old adage ” Go Big, or Go Home!”

Send feedback and answers to info@petelamb.com , and I will discuss your thoughts on this problem.

Stay Safe!

Pete Lamb